June 24th

Mini cadets.jpg

PCC welcomes Kent’s first ever Mini Cadets to the police family!

 

Matthew Scott presented the county’s first Mini Cadets with their “passing out” certificates, at a special awards ceremony in Dartford.

 

Twelve pupils from Temple Hill Primary Academy have spent the last nine weeks learning about the police, road safety and online safety. They’d visited a police station and taken part in drills, as well as monitoring the driving taking place around their school by parents at pick up time! They also shared their knowledge with members of the public at the Kent Police Engagement Centre in Bluewater.  A police medic also taught them life saving skills, including first aid, CPR and how to get help from the emergency services.

 

The project was funded by the Police and Crime Commissioner and Matthew Scott is keen to expanding the programme to other schools across the county. He said,

 

‘This is such a positive initiative and I’m delighted the children have responded so well and benefitted so much from it.

 

Some of these young people were nervous before they joined, and some didn’t really trust the police.  However, they’ve all loved it and have flourished as a result.   

 

It’s one of just a few mini cadet programmes in the whole country and I’m glad Kent has been at the forefront of such a positive trial and I hope to expand it to other areas soon.’

 

Superintendent Jason Wenlock, who was at the ceremony, said,

 

‘The children involved in this initiative have put in an exceptional amount of effort and truly flourished.  The progress they have made has been very pleasing.

 

‘I am confident the lessons they have learned will have a long lasting impact and, should they wish to one day join the police or another public body, I am sure they will make outstanding contributions.

 

The Head of Temple Hill primary, Leon Dawson, said he was thrilled his school had taken part and three of the new Mini Cadets, Year 6 students, Caitlin, Emmanuel and Narmithan couldn’t keep the smiles from their face.   Caitlin said,

 

“Mini Cadets has been brilliant! It’s helped me make more friends and I now know what I want to be when I grow up, I want to be a social worker and the Mini Cadet staff have told me I can do that if I really want to.”

 

Emmunuel said, “Mini cadets have given me more confidence and we have done things we would never have been able to, like visiting a police station and seeing the police dogs.”

 

Narmithan said, “It’s been a big inspiration and its been lots of fun too. I’m sad it’s finished now but I would recommend it to other children.”

 

In addition to the mini cadets initiative, Kent Police also runs a cadets programme for young people aged 13 to 17.

 

Volunteers involved in the scheme meet once a week and participate in a number of community initiatives across the year. 

 

For more information, visit the Kent Police website.